Citizenship

Within Years 10 and 11 all students study the discrete subject of Citizenship which culminates in a GCSE qualification.

Current Year 10 students follow the new 2016 Edexcel syllabus. This course is made up of five themes:

Theme A - Living together in the UK. This looks at issues such as:
What is a community?

  • What give us our identity?
  • Migration – pros and cons
  • Human rights
  • Political rights.

Theme B – Democracy at work in the UK. This looks at how the UK is governed:

  • Voting and elections
  • Different types of governments
  • How laws are made
  • How the government controls and uses its budget

Theme C – How the law works:

  • What is the point of law?
  • Criminal and civil law
  • The justice system
  • How can we reduce crime?

Theme D – Power and Influence. This looks at various ways in which governments, organisations including the media have power or influence over society:

  • Trade Unions
  • Democracy
  • Media – the press and free speech
  • European Union
  • The Commonwealth
  • The United Nations

Theme E – Taking Citizenship Action. Here students choose an issue linked to the above four themes. They create a campaign to raise awareness of this chosen issue within the local community.

Unlike the legacy 2012 syllabus followed by current Year 11 students there are no pieces of controlled assessment to complete.

Students sit two exams at the end of Year 11 – both exams are worth 50% of the final examination grade. All five themes mentioned above are assessed across the two exams.

 

 

 

 

Year 11 students currently follow the legacy 2012 syllabus with Edxcel – This course is made up of four units two of which were completed in year 10 and the remaining two are completed in Year 11.

Unit 1 – Citizenship today. This unit is broken up into three separate themes.

 

a.     Rights and Responsibilities which looks at issues such as human rights and employment rights. It looks further into examples where some countries do not agree to the human rights agreement and discriminate on many different levels.

b.    Power, politics and the media looks at how laws are created and the justice system as a whole. It looks at different types of political structures such as democracies as well as dictatorships and allows the students to understand how Britain’s government operates and the process in which a government is chosen. Students look at how different forms of media report to the general public and how papers can be biased on how they report depending on their core values and opinions.

c.     The Global Community focuses more on the idea of how we as a nation can be more sustainable and reduce the impact of climate change or reduce the exploitation of individuals who work in sweatshops. Students look at how being part of the E.U. and Commonwealth affects us and the role of the United Nations.

Unit 2 – Participating in Society.

This is the first of two controlled assessments where students are asked to choose an issue studied in the above three themes. Students are encouraged to gain the views and opinions of others about their chosen issue as well as to raise people’s awareness of the issue itself. Examples of issues chosen by students include: Should the voting age be reduced to 18? Gender equality – does it exist? Should we continue to purchase items that are made in sweatshops?

Unit 3 – Citizenship in Context

As with Unit 1 it is broken down into three themes:

Citizenship

Within Years 10 and 11 all students study the discrete subject of Citizenship which culminates in a GCSE qualification.

We currently follow the Edxcel syllabus which is made up of four units two of which are completed in year 10 and the remaining two are completed in Year 11.

Unit 1 – Citizenship today. This unit is broken up into three separate themes.

a.     Rights and Responsibilities which looks at issues such as human rights and employment rights. It looks further into examples where some countries do not agree to the human rights agreement and discriminate on many different levels.

b.    Power, politics and the media looks at how laws are created and the justice system as a whole. It looks at different types of political structures such as democracies as well as dictatorships and allows the students to understand how Britain’s government operates and the process in which a government is chosen. Students look at how different forms of media report to the general public and how papers can be biased on how they report depending on their core values and opinions.

c.     The Global Community focuses more on the idea of how we as a nation can be more sustainable and reduce the impact of climate change or reduce the exploitation of individuals who work in sweatshops. Students look at how being part of the E.U. and Commonwealth affects us and the role of the United Nations.

Unit 2 – Participating in Society.

This is the first of two controlled assessments where students are asked to choose an issue studied in the above three themes. Students are encouraged to gain the views and opinions of others about their chosen issue as well as to raise people’s awareness of the issue itself. Examples of issues chosen by students include: Should the voting age be reduced to 18? Gender equality – does it exist? Should we continue to purchase items that are made in sweatshops?

Unit 3 – Citizenship in Context

As with Unit 1 it is broken down into three themes which follows on from the work in Unit 1.

Students may be taught one or all of the following three themes and will only be expected to sit a final exam on one of the themes. For example if they are taught about Environmental change…… they will sit that exam in Year 11. If they are taught all three themes the students will be able to choose which theme they want to sit the exam in.

a.     Environmental Change and Sustainable Development.

b.    Changing Communities: social and cultural identities.

c.     Influencing and changing decisions in society and government.

d.     

Unit 4 – Citizenship Campaign.

This is the second and final piece of controlled assessment which encompasses what the students have learnt throughout the course. The students choose an issue that they are interested such as human rights, environmental issues etc. that they feel are important to them. Through research and planning the student create campaigns to raise the issues status within the school and the local community. Campaigns in the past have included radio interviews, articles in the school newsletter, presentations to assemblies and e-petitions such as ‘should the voting age be brought down to 16 years of age?’