British Values

British Values – Kenilworth School Audit (Updated March 2018)

The Government emphasises that schools are required to ensure that key ‘British Values’ are taught in all UK schools. The government set out its definition of British values in the 2011 Prevent Strategy.

The five British Values are:

  • Democracy
  • The rule of law
  • Individual liberty
  • Mutual Respect
  • Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Kenilworth School uses elements of study across the subject areas and beyond to ensure that all students have access to British values across all key stages. The examples that follow show some of the ways we as a school seeks to embed British Values ay Key Stage 3, 4 and where applicable Key Stage 5. 

Click Here to download a copy of the British Values

English Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 3

 

 

 

 

 

Through our texts which focus of prejudice we are able to have moral discussions on why the events are wrong/ bad etc.

Texts such as 'Trash' 'Noughts and Crosses', 'Al Capone Does My Shirts' explore other cultures but also prejudice for social groups which include: race, disability and class/caste.

Key Stage 4

 

 

Texts we teach focus on political ideologies and how we take our democratic rights for granted today but these were rights denied others during other periods in history.

An Inspector Calls lends itself to the moral debate on whether it is a crime to persecute an individual because of their class and gender. It suggests the world turns a blind eye if business and money are involved

In our Shakespeare study we learn about the lack of autonomy woman had right up until very recently and how this impacted on Elizabethan audiences. We then compare the reactions of a modern audience.

We study some very graphic poetry about war, and question the reasons for killing; both the glory, the futility and the long-term effects of war. These ideas about morality are discussed/written about in the context of respect, right, wrong etc.

 

 

Poetry explores cultural conflict and the experiences and feelings of immigrants and those with dual nationality.

Key Stage 5

 

 

Texts such as 1984 explore civil liberty and challenge the idea of control by the state.

 

We explore the representation of social groups through our language studies: how language is biased, gendered and how this impacts on the perceptions of others, how gender and racial groups are perceived – linking directly with equality.

We study the gendered presentation of language and texts from the past which are deemed inappropriate for today's society but were widely accepted during the time of publication.

We study texts like Shakespeare's Othello which feature on the Lang/Lit and the language course which explores identity and 'otherness'

 

Mathematics Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

All Key Stages

The mathematics department encourages learning and behaviour strategies that allow all pupils a fair chance to answer and to explain their methods. Pupils in all year groups, as part of their work on Data Handling, study the creation of questionnaires and examine bias, sampling methods, how mathematics is used and abused, and how data can be used to change perception, opinion, action and cause reaction. Opportunities to discuss viewpoints are encouraged in Mathematics lessons and the use of data has a significant role in the democratic decision making and influencing change. Students will hear statistics quoted to justify and argue for particular positions. The development of critical thinking skills using mathematics will help develop student resilience. At the same time, students are reminded of an expectation of respect for all others.

We have high expectations of all pupils which are made clear in the routines that have been established in the department with regards to acceptable behaviour and the level of work required. We consistently follow school policy with regards to the use of the Sleuth monitoring system for rewards and punishments, and pupils are aware that their actions carry a consequence.

Within mathematics there are opportunities to study areas where numerical data is part of the rule of law. Examples to teach different aspects of mathematics can come directly from statistics used in law. The Office of National Statistics may be helpful (GCSE students) and it could include use of national statistics to identify strong, weak and negative correlation in understanding the dangers of assuming causation. At all times within the subject, students are encouraged to recognise an individual’s strength and support their development. Students are encouraged to embrace diversity and treat all others with respect both in and out of the classroom.

Pupils are encouraged to develop their thinking skills when analysing mathematical questions which will enable them to think through ideas critically. Pupils can attend additional revision classes, run by the mathematics department, to support their individual progress.

Students will discuss choices in terms of future education choices and careers.

Pupils are encouraged to believe in their own ability in order to reach their potential in Mathematics.

We foster a “can do” attitude and provide a safe learning environment so that pupils have the freedom to try, and try again, without fear of failure. We stress that it is okay to make mistakes as long as you learn from them, and each other, and are able to move on and make progress.

At various points in the Schemes of work, pupils in all year groups will study Mathematics from different cultures including the origins of calculus, Pythagoras, the Fibonacci numbers in work on Sequences, and tessellating patterns and symmetry. Good working relationships in the classroom and around the school promote effective learning.

Values such as respect, tolerance of other opinions and positive criticism are embedded in Mathematics. An underpinning drive to develop students who are resilient, respectful, determined and respectful in Mathematics creates a positive set of values to apply to all areas of life.

Geography Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 3

 

 

Yr9 students study the difference between communism and capitalism which involves notions of democracy (in China unit)

 

Students are often to exposed to the idea of voting for the best idea and so on

 

All students are encouraged to discuss and justify their beliefs.

 

Students are taught about their responsibilities in looking after their environment on a regular basis

 

Within the migration topic in Year 7 students are encouraged to respect each other’s different backgrounds.

 

All students are encouraged to discuss and respect others opinions

Migration is taught in Yr7 and students are taught about the need for empathy and tolerance.

India is taught in Yr8 and students look at the variety of people who live there, respecting all backgrounds.

 

Key Stage 4

 

 

 

 

All students are encouraged to discuss and justify their beliefs.

 

 

When discussing migration and political issues students are encouraged to respect each other’s opinions

Year 10 study the impact of migration of British cities and the positives of a variety of people.

Key Stage 5

 

 

Students study the idea of different political systems as part of the Superpowers course (Yr13) and in Globalisation (Yr12)

 

Yr13 students study the difference between communism and capitalism which involves notions of democracy (in Superpowers unit)

 

Students will study the role of the British government and Inter-Governmental Organisations in decision making around the world

 

 

All students are encouraged to discuss and justify their beliefs.

When discussing migration, globalisation, Superpowers and political issues students are encouraged to respect each other’s opinions

Year 12 study Coventry and how it has changed over time, including demography (as part of the Regeneration unit)

 

Study of different religious and political outlooks in shaping the changing nature of power in the world (Yr13 Superpowers) and encouraging understanding and tolerance of these differences.

 

Modern Foreign Languages Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 3

 

 

 

 

Responsibility to learn in class together as a group and not detract from other pupils’ learning.

We encourage respect for cultures in other countries.

 

Key Stage 4

 

 

 

 

Responsibility to learn in class together as a group and not detract from other pupils’ learning.

We encourage respect for cultures in other countries.

 

Key Stage 5

 

 

 

 

Responsibility to learn in class together as a group and not detract from other pupils’ learning.

We encourage respect for cultures in other countries.

 

History Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 3

 

 

Students look at the development of democracy in the UK, especially the political developments of the 1800s and 1900s with an increase in the voting population of different social classes and genders. Magna Carta and King John are referenced, as well as the English Civil War and the growing role of Parliament in the nation. Democracy in the USA is looked at as part of the Year 9 course.

The Norman Conquest, and the changing law of the land in the Medieval period are assessed as part of the Year 7 course.

 

 

The changing lives of women, children and class as well as different ethnic groups are considered across KS3.

 

Students look at the rise and fall of Empire and how this impacted on the lives of individuals in the 18th century through to the 20th century.

 

Britain’s role in the abolition of the Slave Trade is covered in Year 8.

Students study the Slave Trade and the implications it has and still has to this day in the USA and around the world.

 

Students compare their upbringing and education in Year 7 to highlight similarities and differences with a focus on different people have different experiences in life.

In Year 7, students do some work on the Crusades and the differing views of both Christians and Muslims, looking at interpretations.

 

In Year 8 students look at the development of scientific views and tensions between religious and scientific thought.

 

In Year 9, students look at the growth of communism and differing views and how societies

Key Stage 4

 

 

Students look at the growth and role of Parliament in Tudor England and the role of the monarch as Head of State and the splitting of power.

Students in Year 10 focus on how the law has changed over a thousand years in England, with a focus on law and order within the nation and changing views on punishment.

The rights of people over time in society is covered as part of changing law – greater equality for women, homosexuality, abortion and developed laws against domestic violence.

Students cover the social changes of the 1960s and life today.

As part of the GCSE unit, students look at the role of Conscientious Objectors to WWI and WWII, reasons behind these objections and how attitudes changed over time

Key Stage 5

 

 

The Modern A Level looks at dictatorships in other nations, with a focus on Communist nations as well as the collapse of these systems in the late 1980s.

The Early Modern Course looks at the changing Acts of Parliament through the Reformation and the religious changes implemented in England and Wales as well as punishments associated.

The Modern A Level refers to the control of population under Communist rule and the destruction of personal liberties across the Soviet Union and East Germany with Secret police and Purges.

Debate is encouraged as part of the A Level course, with presentation of views.

 

Citizenship Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 4

 

 

Students understand the differences between a Direct democracy and a Representative democracy. They understand the election process between the different political parties and how the current voting method works as well as looking at alternative methods (e.g. proportional representation). Students understand the role of government on a local and national scale and how policies are developed.

Students understand what laws are and why they are needed. Students understand the difference between civil and criminal laws as well as civil and criminal courts.

 

Students understand how the justice system works and the different types of sentences that be given by courts. Students also look at how crime can be reduced on both a local and national scale.

Students take part in the Youth Elections as well as voting for School Council representatives – this allows students to take part in the voting process before the legal age of 18 for local and national elections.

 

Students have the opportunity to air their views and opinions about a variety of topics / news articles linked to Citizenship – freedom of speech.

Due to the nature of some of the topics e.g. politics and immigration students have a wide range of opinions.

 

Students are encouraged to respect one another’s views and opinions and allow each other to speak but also allow themselves to alter their own views and opinions based on new information learnt within the lessons.

Students understand how the Human Rights Act protects individuals and how many democratic countries have implemented laws to legally protect individual’s human rights and prevent discrimination from happening.

 

Using current affairs students are able to discuss a variety of political, religious and humanitarian events allowing them to have a fuller understanding of the issue. A good example of this are the numerous causes of why refugees are fleeing Syria to Europe and in cases seeking asylum within the UK and other European countries.

 

This allows students to develop tolerance and understanding of different faiths and cultural beliefs.

Art Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 3

 

 

Each discussion period of lessons promotes the importance of healthy debate and the importance of sharing opposing views.

 

 

Project: Urban environments/Street Art (y8): Students learn the difference between street art and graffiti.

 

When using dangerous equipment (e.g., craft knives, hot glue guns, rolling pins), students must adhere to strict usage policies or face consequences.

Project: African art and the roles within a tribe. Roles of women in the Ndebele tribe. (y7).

 

Y7, 8 and 9: Students MUST give opinions when commenting on the work studied, learning to do this in a way that is respectful and well structured.

 

Project: Dreamlike (y7), personal expression and imagination is valued to create surreal work.

 

Project: Doodling & journey (y8), for arts festival about ‘Migration’, the movement of groups and individuals

Group collective work (y8)

 

Students study the similarities and differences between body art in the UK and in Africa (Y7)

 

Y7, 8 and 9: Students MUST give opinions when commenting on the work studied, learning to do this in a way that is respectful and well structured.

 

The sharing of resources within a group is also something addressed at KS3.

 

Project: Doodling & journey (y8), for arts festival about ‘Migration’, reasons why groups or individuals may move or be forced to move.

Project: African Art and body art (y7), how symbols can be spiritual. Challenging the idea of ‘normal’.

Project: Aboriginal art (y8), students learn how Walkabout is a spiritual journey.

Project: Mortality & Dia de los Muertos (Y9). Day of the dead in Mexico – learn about features and beliefs about this day.

Key Stage 4

*Dependent on students’ individual projects

 

 

A student may choose to study current affairs as part of their project*.

Students are aware that art work can be used as a form of freedom of expression/free speech.

When using dangerous equipment (e.g., craft knives, hot glue guns, rolling pins), students must adhere to strict usage policies or face consequences.

Students develop the ability to give opinions on art work and/or current affairs* to link their visual work to that of others.

 

Students are inspired to be creative and independent in their judgement.

Sharing of resources in class.

 

Group/peer assessment used to support development of new ideas as part of the project.

Students have the opportunity to study artists that look at a variety of faiths and beliefs*.

 

Key Stage 5

*Dependent on students’ individual projects

 

 

Artwork as a form of free speech and freedom of expression is encouraged in more depth.

Students have access to more dangerous materials during independent study.

Students work highly independently and need to show high levels of initiative to complete work

 

Students are inspired to be creative and independent in their judgement.

 

 

Keeping the studios and shared desks tidy and in a safe and suitable environment for others.

 

Extra-curricular trip to London galleries needs mutual respect for other gallery guests and people working within the institutions.

 

 

Students have the opportunity to study artists that look at a variety of faiths and beliefs*.

 

Music Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 3

 

 

Students work together in groups and will choose a leader/leaders – these leaders will have been ‘elected’ as part of a democratic process

 

 

Music from across cultures, including African Slave Music, Chinese Music, Indian Music.

Students learn not only the musical context but also gain an insight into culture, geography and demographics.

Built into the SoW are the reminders of different cultures and a respect for their music, traditions as well as

 

During lessons when performing, students are expected to respectful, supportive and mindful of others when performances to the class are taking place.

Indian Music – music is an integral part of culture and of worship.

 

Brazilian Samba – Music is a part of the culture in Brazil. We learn about the history, immigration and socio-economic culture

 

Key Stage 4

 

 

For ensemble performances – these leaders will have been ‘elected’ as part of a democratic process

 

 

 

Music from across cultures, for example African Slave Music.

Students learn not only the musical context but also gain an insight into culture, geography and demographics.

 

During lessons when performing, students are expected to respectful, supportive and mindful of others when performances to the class are taking place.

Indian Music – music is an integral part of culture and of worship.

 

PSHE Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Year 7

 

 

 

 

Autumn 1: Human Rights – What are our human rights and how do we uphold them. Pupils explore their own responsibility.

 

Summer 1: British values - Explore what it means to be British

Autumn 1: Human Rights – What are our human rights which includes respect.

Summer 1: British Values – Pupils explore how we can best help those in need such as asylum seekers to help them develop an understanding of where they come from.

 

Summer 2: Pupils explore how they are connected to the world and how their actions can impact others.

Autumn 1: Human Rights – Freedom of religion. They have the responsibility to be tolerant of others.

 

Summer 1: British Values – Pupils how we can best help those in need such as asylum seekers to build a tolerance, they also explore the benefits of living in multicultural Britain and why should celebrate this.

Year 8

 

 

Autumn 1 : Pupils explore the local council and their role within it through a 6 lesson scheme of work.

 

Spring 1: Active Citizens – Pupils explore how they can be active and make an impact in their local community.

Summer 2:  The law – Pupils explore over a scheme of work how the law is formed and ran in this country. Enables students to distinguish right from wrong and to respect the civil and criminal law of England.

 

Spring 2: Body Image: Enables students to develop their self-knowledge, self-esteem and self-confidence

 

Summer 2:  The law – Pupils look at how the law impacts them as an individual.

Spring 1: Community Identity – Pupils explore their place within a community and how to be a good citizen. They explore how to make a community cohesive.

Spring 1: Community Identity – Pupils explore their place within a community and how racism can have a negative impact on community cohesive.

Year 9

 

 

Autumn 1: Pupils complete a 7 lesson scheme of work on UK governed. They investigate the idea of democracy and how they can make their voices be heard in the future. It can encourage respect for democracy and support for participation in the democratic processes.

Summer 2: How are you connected to the world? Pupils look at how they can also have a say in what happens around the globe. For example in the commonwealth and the UN.

 

Summer 2: How are you connected to the world? Pupils explore how decisions are made worldwide and reflect on how things are done in Britain.

Spring 1: R&S Education. Encourages pupils to be self-aware and safe.

Autumn 2: Prejudice and Discrimination Pupils spend 6 lessons exploring what it is and the negative impact it can have on a society. It encourages respect for other people and looks at case studies of the good that come out of showing respect.

 

Summer 2: Pupils explore how they are connected to the world and how their actions can impact others.

Autumn 2: Prejudice and Discrimination Pupils spend 6 lessons exploring what it is and the negative impact it can have on a society. Within this they look at Islamaphobia. It encourages tolerance and harmony between different cultural traditions by enabling students to acquire an appreciation for and respect for their own and other cultures.

 

Business Studies Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 4

 

 

 

Impact of laws on businesses and other stakeholders (GCSE Applied and GCSE Business)

 

 

Social Enterprise (GCSE Applied)

Key Stage 5

 

 

Economic markets, political ideology and the link to economic policies and decision making (AS Economics)

 

Students look at the development of democracy in developing countries and the implication for their economies and citizens (A level Economics)

 

Free market vs Planned economies (AS Economics)

How governments regulate markets and the impact of EU laws have on the UK economy. (AS Economics)

 

The changing lives of women, children and class are considered in UK labour markets over the last 30 years. (Economics)

Forced labour and modern slavery taught in Theme 4 (Business A level)

Individual employee rights and the right to belong to a employee group (Economics and Business A level and GCSE)

 

 

Discrimination and policies to correct it (Economics A level)

 

The importance of greater equality within a modern economic society (A level Economics)

 

Businesses as a stakeholder in local communities and emerging markets (A level Business)

 

 

Business ethics. Impact of religion on recruitment and marketing strategies.

 

Moral decision making in economics (A level Economics)

Religious Studies Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 3

 

 

Students will use the system of voting to assess homework.

The idea of democracy is also touched upon in the ‘Our beliefs and values’ topic.

In Yr9 we do explore briefly how democracy was used to vote in Hitler and discuss briefly how this was removed as he gave himself absolute power and discuss the positives and negatives of this.

 

We reflect on the need for rules in the classroom.

Students explore the 10 commandments and reflect on the need for Law and Rules.

Pupils study the Rule of Law and moral and ethical issues related to it, for example. Should capital punishment be reintroduced? Were the Nuremburg laws moral and fair?

Students continually engage in expression of their own views and right to choose in relation to a range of issues such as sanctity of life.

We look at the rights of particular faith members and how a lack of such rights could present issues for individuals. Personal views and choices are facilitated during discussions and assessments.

 

This is a key underlining theme in R.E.  Learning about a variety of types of people, beliefs and cultures promotes Mutual Respect.

We have Holocaust survivors that come into school, Christian Aid, NGO’s all striving to educate and promote respect. We engage in exploring a range of issues related to prejudice and discrimination. This includes sexism, racism, ageism, genocide and much more. We look at how we can respect each other by looking after the environment and the ‘home’ we all share.

All six of the major world faiths are studied. We also look at some of the smaller and/or younger faith groups during yr9.

We ensure Schemes of work and pupil study includes reflecting on Humanist or Atheist views about a particular issue.

 

Often when teaching on a faith the idea of tolerance of alternative faiths is also highlighted. For example Christianity and the good Samaritan. Or Islam and the idea there is no compulsion in faith.

 

Debates are often had and pupils are taught to make their points in a tolerant and respectful way despite differences of opinion in the room.

Key Stage 4

 

 

We look at the need for Law and how laws link to Human rights.  We also study the democratic process and look at the electoral process.

This can be compared to other ‘systems’ of rule during discussions.

We look at a variety of sources of guidance including the Law. We study the need for Law and punishment and study the need for faiths to promote a sense of law and justice. Look at international law in relation to the UN and war. May ethical concepts are discussed with a view to our opinions on if the law needs to be changed, for example to allow cloning or not.

Pupils are encouraged to express their views about thing we have studied in a respectful environment. Such views relate to a massive range of issues such as racism, was, poverty, sexism, role of women/men, drugs, war and the existence of God as well as much, much more.

Students in KS4 are taught to respect all faiths and develop a deep understanding for the two main faiths studied, Christianity and Islam. Key teaching from both faiths (and others) that promote respect are often used when teaching and evaluated in the lesson. We look at stewardship, sanctity of life and the right to choose and decide for yourself whilst respecting the views of there is very much central to R.S. at KS4.

Students are taught to develop their own views with justification but have tolerance for the views, beliefs and world narrative held by others, even if they do not agree. Teaching from faith about respect and tolerance are often mentioned. We study issues related to immigration and refugees which naturally promotes a real understanding and will often result in more tolerance from pupils.

Themes we explore include forgiveness and justice. To add we look at the worldwide family of Christians and/or Muslims and the variety of cultures, language, race and ages that are included in one faith group.

Key Stage 5

 

 

Students explore democratic systems and responses to them while exploring Dietrich Bonhoeffer and his justification of civil disobedience under a tyrant. They also explore whether civil disobedience is justified under democracy in the UK.

We also gather how laws are made under a democracy relating to ethical issues such as euthanasia and business ethics.

Democratic systems within religion are also considered and the issue of whether there should be more representation from women.

Students understand law surrounding areas such as euthanasia, sex, business and discrimination.

We also reflect on and consider the Harm Principle: how this has come about (from Utilitarian principles), how it influences law and whether or not it is a good principle. Students have the chance to air their own view on this.

Student have the opportunity to air their views on ethical issues such as euthanasia, sexual ethics and business.

They also have the opportunity to discuss their views on what matters in morality e.g. the teachings of a God or a more secular view such as personal autonomy or the greatest good for the greatest number.

Students are actively encouraged to respect each other’s views and be tolerant. Due to the nature of the course (covering sensitive issues) we approach debate in a mature way and give them the opportunity to respond to different views and arguments.

In general, respect is encouraged for all people regardless of beliefs.

When evaluating beliefs and concepts through essays, students are required to evaluate in a respectful and mature manner.

Due to the nature of the course, not only do students tolerate different views but we approach them with respect.

Within all of the A Level we cover a range of different beliefs e.g. Speaking in tongues in Evangelical Churches. Students have to approach this in a respectful way but also be ready to explore the consequences of such views in a sensitive way.

We also work with different faith groups and arrange visits. For example, we take students to the Forest Hermitage. This is a Buddhist centre and students are respectful towards the group but also ask questions.

PE Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 3

 

 

 

All pupils are fully aware of the rules of each of the sporting activities that they play

 

 

When pupils are playing in games within school and against other school they will always respect their team mates, officials and the opposition

 

Key Stage 4

 

 

 

All pupils are fully aware of the rules of each of the sporting activities that they play

 

 

When pupils are playing in games within school and against other school they will always respect their team mates, officials and the opposition

 

Key Stage 5

 

 

 

All pupils are fully aware of the rules of each of the sporting activities that they play

 

 

When pupils are playing in games within school and against other school they will always respect their team mates, officials and the opposition

 

 

Psychology  Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 5

 

 

Students explore obedience and how obedience relates to extremist views in society.

 

Students explore the dangers of authority without responsibility

 

They also explore how people resist malign influences

 

Students understand the law surrounding areas such as animal research, human ethics and mental health.

 

Student have the opportunity to discuss the ethics of human research and how changes in society has influenced the nature of research with human participants.

 

Students are actively encouraged to respect each other’s views and be tolerant. Due to the nature of the course (covering sensitive issues) we approach debate in a mature way and give them the opportunity to respond to different views and arguments.

In general, respect is encouraged for all people regardless of beliefs.

When evaluating beliefs and concepts through essays, students are required to evaluate in a respectful and mature manner.

Students explore how research has been biased through etic and emic assumptions about the nature of humanity.

 

Students also explore the limits of individual freedom through considerations about the limits of abnormality.

 

Sociology Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 5

 

 

Views of the media, theories of whether our media allow us to have democratic viewpoints or not.

Crime and deviance – the difference between crime and deviance and how communities are effected by crime.

The rights of people over time in society is covered as part of changing law – greater equality for women, homosexuality, abortion and developed laws against domestic violence, adoption  (Families topic)

 

A range of different viewpoints are discussed within the media.

 

Debate is encouraged, students have to consider inequalities that are faced by members of society.

 

Students have to  consider and be respectful of a wide range of viewpoints / theories

Ethnic differences in achievement, families and crime. Also consideration of how different ethnic groups and faiths are presented in the media.

 

Politics Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 5

 

 

At AS level the students learn about the democratic processes in the UK. This includes the different voting systems for each type of elected representative. Students also study other ways that they can get involved in political participation such as through joining a political party, completing e petitions and joining pressure groups. The A2 students organise the Sixth Form debating society where all types of topics are debated which include the 5 areas that cover the British values. The AS trip to Parliament enables the students to see Parliament itself and meet an MP. This not only improves their knowledge, it also helps them to identify with a key British institution.

In the AS unit 2, students learn about the judiciary and the different types of law such as common law. They learn about how the Supreme court works and the AS trip to the Supreme Court enables them to identify with a key British institution.

In the A2 unit 3, individual liberty is widely studied. The importance of liberty is stressed, whilst operating through a democratic framework.

In the A2 unit 4, mutual respect and toleration are taught through the multiculturalism. The need to be aware of cultural, ethnic and faith differences whilst operating in the democratic framework is taught.

 

Drama Department

Key Stage

Democracy

Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Respect

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Key Stage 3

 

 

Explored through negotiation and development of practical work

Explored through part of a scheme of work on knife crime.

 

Students are constantly encouraged to respect other performances’ during the evaluation process.

Explored through workshops in Year 7 and 9 Drama

Key Stage 4

 

 

Explored through negotiation and development of practical work

Study of Blood Brothers – the impact and consequences of crime.

 

Year 10 devised scheme on Crime and Punishment.

 

Exploration of key Theatre practitioners including Marxist Bertolt Brecht

Set text of the Crucible – exploring individual freedoms against a backdrop of oppressions.

 

Blood Brothers – looking at an individual’s approach to the class divide.

 

Study of Blood Brothers and Workshop techniques.

 

Analysis of one another’s performance.

Explored through Workshops and Debate- set texts such as Blood Brothers and The Crucible.

 

Exploring other belief systems through the devised drama component.

Key Stage 5

 

 

Explored through negotiation and development of practical work.

 

Study of Greek Theatre and Greek History.

Study of Sophocles’ Antigone.

 

Study of Our Country’s Good – British law during the establishment of colonialism in the Australian penal colonies and the punishment of those sent for transportation.

 

Exploration of key Theatre practitioners including Marxist Bertolt Brecht

Study of Sophocles’ Antigone and Wertenbaker’s Our Country’s Good.

 

Potential exploration of Butterworth’s Jerusalem and the issue of individual identity in contemporary society.

Study of Sophocles’ Antigone.

 

 

Analysis of performance and the work of other actors   

Study of Sophocles’ Antigone, Greek theatre and Greek History.

               

Exploration of key Theatre practitioners including Marxist Bertolt Brecht, Antonin Artaud and Constantin Stanislavski – all rooted in their original context.